Ugly Buildings, Are Ugly For A Reason

Ugly Buildings, Are Ugly For A Reason

There are nice looking buildings, and unfortunately ugly ones. The ramifications for creating an ugly building means that communities have to live with the results for decades. This simple fact distinguishes Architecture from other professions where a product can be used for a much shorter period of time and then discarded. Because of the financial investment in building, being careful on what you allow to be built is critical to a building’s life and community.
 
Here’s an example of a horrible developer and designer, who was probably a structural engineer or a very unskilled architect. One can just read this residential building and hear the conversation. “Keep it as cheap as possible, but lets add balconies to be a feature that will get people to purchase the units.
 

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[winter] Tips for taking care of snow

[winter] Tips for taking care of snow

Every winter, at least those with a lot of snow, we pull out our shovels and get to it. But there are things you can do to make the snow go away faster, and make the job easier…

It goes without saying that removing snow from sidewalks is imperative to keep people safe from falls and make life easier for those pushing strollers, or for old people to get around.  One winter while shoveling my own sidewalk I looked across a street and saw an elderly woman literally stuck at a crosswalk.  There was no way for her to cross as the snow was just too deep. Upon approaching her with my shovel she quickly apologized saying she had to get to the pharmacy.  So I shoveled a path for her to get to the other sidewalk.  It’s just too bad those who lived on those corner lots didn’t take care of this themselves.

So lets get to the tips:

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[architecture] Avery Fisher Renovation, by Nicholas Buccalo – NY Times

New York Times: Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center

Lincoln Center and the New York Philharmonic announced the final details yesterday of their collaborative plan to renovate the stage of Avery Fisher Hall. The renovation is to take place from Aug. 23 to Sept. 12. It is to cost $3 million, and will involve no alterations to the hall itself.

The announcement was made at a news conference by Nathan Leventhal, the president of Lincoln Center, and Deborah Borda, the general manager of the Philharmonic. Also present were Kurt Masur, the orchestra’s music director; Russell Johnson, the chairman of Artec Consultants and the project’s acoustician, and John Burgee, the Architect who oversaw the hall’s last renovation, in 1976, and who is overseeing the visual aspects of the current renovation.

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The dark side of the Building Code

Every building code is designed to keep people safe and improve their lives, but often the code imposes a negative impact on the potential quality of a place.

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Best way to hide those pesky Windows 10 upgrade messages

Best way to hide those pesky Windows 10 upgrade messages

Lets get to it, a quick and direct step by step guide to turn off those pesky ‘Upgrade to Windows 10’ messages and hide them from returning, including removing the blue Windows 10 Update icon from the tray.

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A small renovation doesn’t mean small clients.

We get quite a few clients who want to do a renovation on a budget, if you can call NYC construction prices ‘budget.’  So we provide them with the professional services they need to get them on their way, resulting in a set of Construction Documents that help them obtain bids, a contractor and a work permit to do the work. Along the way we have interacted with all sorts of clients and inquiries…

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[Client Question: How does the permit process work?

On January 1, 2016 at 11:42 PM wrote:

Sorry – still confused. How would the expeditor contact our contractor? They would just give us the permit. So the plans are filed with the asbestos report. The city gives us permits even though work is already done. We show permits and plans to electrician and plumber. They sign off (assuming no issue). Then that goes back to the city and we either get legalized or they ask for site visit?
Is that correct?

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Top 5 Reasons I (reluctantly) Hired An Architect…

1) “I was told by the city I have to submit plans to get a work permit before my construction can start. What a hassle.  My cousin drew up a sketch, why can’t we use that?”

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