Minimum Adult-Sized Bedroom/Closet Analysis

We all love to see images of luxury homes, don’t we? But what about the other 98% of the human population? What kind of world do they live in? There has to be better minimum acceptable livable habitation requirements for the modern adult, to help them succeed in life. This can be accomplished with the right home programming, ensuring that the inhabitant’s needs are met in an efficient function environment that also raises their ‘positive spirit.’

There are so many different configurations for bedrooms and their associated closets, often the context in which they lie dictates its ultimate layout and size, but what if one looks at each element alone to establish what the smallest bedroom dimensions should be, that is, comfortable in size for a typical adult, to help establish a minimum guideline Architects, Developers and Home Owners should achieve as a minimum when programming a dwelling design.

This type of analysis is fundamental to dwelling design especially related to basic urban dwellings in townhouses, renovations of suburban homes, apartments, condos, co-ops or even designing layouts for housing projects if one cares enough about those who may have to occupy the space provided. This analysis is what Architect Nick Buccalo of SimpleTwig Architecture sets out to do with regards to two basic components of the dwelling, a bedroom and its closet. Future articles will address other programming requirements of dwelling, programming refers here to the basic room names one knows and how those rooms relate to one another.

For this study, we assume the requirements for one adult, which, as adults we all know or hope, the rooms are flexible enough to accommodate two people.

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Ugly Buildings, Are Ugly For A Reason

Ugly Buildings, Are Ugly For A Reason

There are nice looking buildings, and unfortunately ugly ones. The ramifications for creating an ugly building means that communities have to live with the results for decades. This simple fact distinguishes Architecture from other professions where a product can be used for a much shorter period of time and then discarded. Because of the financial investment in building, being careful on what you allow to be built is critical to a building’s life and community.
 
Here’s an example of a horrible developer and designer, who was probably a structural engineer or a very unskilled architect. One can just read this residential building and hear the conversation. “Keep it as cheap as possible, but lets add balconies to be a feature that will get people to purchase the units.
 

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[architecture] Afghan Cultural Centre 22/24

[architecture] Afghan Cultural Centre 22/24

entranceHandicap Access Attitude: We believe that every space should be accessible by everyone, and that an architectural concept should not be

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[architecture] Afghan Cultural Centre 20/24

[architecture] Afghan Cultural Centre 20/24

The Climb:  This proposal embraces the idea that one needs to ‘make the climb in order to accomplish anything in life’ and as such this is an experiential composition.

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[architecture] Afghan Cultural Centre 19/24

[architecture] Afghan Cultural Centre 19/24

Summer/Winter: The main exterior circular form surrounding the auditorium, called the exterior atrium, has hanging banners during the summer to provide shade which can be removed during the winter months, or changed depending on the venue…

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[architecture] Avery Fisher Renovation, by Nicholas Buccalo – NY Times

New York Times: Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center

Lincoln Center and the New York Philharmonic announced the final details yesterday of their collaborative plan to renovate the stage of Avery Fisher Hall. The renovation is to take place from Aug. 23 to Sept. 12. It is to cost $3 million, and will involve no alterations to the hall itself.

The announcement was made at a news conference by Nathan Leventhal, the president of Lincoln Center, and Deborah Borda, the general manager of the Philharmonic. Also present were Kurt Masur, the orchestra’s music director; Russell Johnson, the chairman of Artec Consultants and the project’s acoustician, and John Burgee, the Architect who oversaw the hall’s last renovation, in 1976, and who is overseeing the visual aspects of the current renovation.

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[architecture] Afghan Cultural Centre 18/24

[architecture] Afghan Cultural Centre 18/24

In the classrooms, there are two ‘floor to ceiling’ windows to allow students to take in the views, but positioned to both not be a distraction during class and to allow natural light to graze the two end walls, maximizing the interior illumination… Read more